SCREENING / PREVENTION / FAMILIAL / OTHER TRIALS

Trials involving mammograms or other screening technologies; trials for women / families with the BRCA gene mutation; trials for breast cancer prevention (e,g. vaccines, lifestyle changes). Some of these may be open to healthy volunteers, while others will be for breast cancer patients.

We’ve made every effort to ensure this information is accurate, but you’ll need to talk to your doctor or contact the trial coordinator to find out more about whether a trial is suitable for you. Are we out of date? If you have updated or new information about a trial, we’d be grateful if you’d share it with us – email your update to ClinicalTrials@nzbcf.org.nz

 

Ask your doctor or contact the trial coordinator if you are interested in joining one of these trials.

  • Screening, Prevention, Familial, Other Trials

     

  • REGISTER YOUR INTEREST

    Tell us if you’re interested in joining a clinical trial.
    We’ll keep searching for new studies
    ClinicalTrials@nzbcf.org.nz

  • Artemin as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for breast cancer (Recruiting)

    Updated: July 13th, 2016

    There is an increasing public health concern for early detection of cancer. A reliable blood test would offer a convenient and accessible way for cancer to be detected early, however, such a blood test does not yet exist. The main purpose of this study is to explore whether a blood test we are developing will be suitable for this purpose. We need you to donate a small amount of blood for our research and help us to find a better method to diagnose breast cancer in the future.

    Researchers at the University of Auckland have identified a small protein, artemin, which is produced in breast cancer. Increased artemin protein levels are observed in around two-thirds of breast cancer tumours and is associated with a less-favourable outcomes in breast cancer subjects. Thus, artemin may be a useful marker to test with a view to detecting breast cancer early. We want to measure the concentration of artemin protein in blood samples collected from healthy persons and breast cancer patients who will either have early stage or advanced stage disease.

    If you agree to take part in this study, we will ask you to give one blood sample whilst you are an outpatient by a qualified nurse or phlebotomist (person whose job is to take blood). The volume of blood will be approximately 6 ml (~1.5 teaspoons). The blood test will be taken at the Clinical Research Centre at the Liggins Institute, the University of Auckland.

    If you’re interested in taking part in this trial, contact Janene Biggs. Tel: (09) 923 5870. Email: j.biggs@auckland.ac.nz.

  • NZFCBS (Recruiting)

    Updated: November 11th, 2015

    The New Zealand Familial Breast Cancer Study commenced in 2013 with the key goal of better understanding DNA sequence changes in genes that alter the risk of developing breast cancer through cutting-edge research with cancer experts from around the world.

    We know that solving the mystery of these genetic changes requires a collaborative effort from many international laboratories and the New Zealand Familial Breast Cancer Study is now in a unique position to do just that through collaborative links with various international scientific groups.

    Have you, or a member of your family/whanau, been tested for a mutation in a breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA1 or BRCA2)?

    Would you be willing to volunteer for the New Zealand Familial Breast Cancer Study, to be conducted by the University of Otago, Christchurch?

    View trial description or contact Dr Logan Walker. Email: logan.walker@otago.ac.nz or  phone: (03) 364 0544

Ask your doctor or contact the trial coordinator if you are interested in joining one of these trials. New Zealand women living in Australia may have access to these trials.

  • Screening, Prevention, Familial, Other Trials

     

  • REGISTER YOUR INTEREST

    Tell us if you’re interested in joining a clinical trial.
    We’ll keep searching for new studies
    ClinicalTrials@nzbcf.org.nz

  •  

    Lifepool (Recruiting)
    Women with or without breast cancer contribute to research improving women’s health

    WHAM (Recruiting)
    Research into the effect of surgical menopause in both healthy women and those at an increased risk of ovarian and breast cancer due to BRCA1 or 2 gene mutations.

    BRCA-D (Recruiting)
    A pilot study evaluating a new breast cancer prevention strategy for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and high risk, non-BRCA carriers.

  • Lifepool (Recruiting)

    Updated: November 1st, 2015

    Participants must live in Australia. Lifepool is a research resource for study into breast cancer and women's health. It aims to recruit 100,000 Australian women. This will establish one of the largest cohorts in the world, providing research tools to answer critical questions about breast cancer. Lifepool aims to gather information on health and lifestyle, mammogram data and asks permission to track the health of each participant through linkage with other health databases. For Lifepool participants who have been diagnosed with breast cancer or who develop breast cancer in the future, Lifepool will also collect some of the leftover cancer tissue from the Pathology laboratory to construct Tissue MicroArrays for research.

    Run by: National Breast Cancer Foundation initiative at various locations in Victoria, Australia – view full trial description and contact details.

  • WHAM (Recruiting)

    Updated: January 18th, 2016

    For women at increased risk of ovarian cancer, removal of the fallopian tubes and ovaries will substantially reduce their risk of ovarian cancer, and may reduce the risk of breast cancer. However, the consequences of this risk-reducing surgery for sexual health, menopausal symptoms, bone and cardiovascular health and cognitive functions are poorly understood.

    This research is to find out more about the effects of menopause after removal of the ovaries and how that may impact on a woman’s life. This information will then be used to inform health care for other women who decide to have this surgery. This project is looking to recruit both healthy women (low risk) and women who are at increased risk of ovarian and breast cancer because they have a family history of ovarian or breast cancer or because they have been diagnosed as carriers of the BRCA1 or 2 gene mutations (high risk). High risk women eligible for the project are those who are planning to have the risk-reducing surgery in the near future but also those choosing to delay the surgery for 2 or more years.

    Participants in this study will be required to undergo blood tests and bone mineral density scanning at baseline and then repeated on an annual basis for 2 years. Participants will also need to complete questionnaires relating to sexual function, menopause, depression/anxiety, and sleep quality at baseline, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months. Participants will also have tests to measure cognitive function at baseline, 3 months, 12 months and 24 months.

    Run by: Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre at various locations in Melbourne and Sydney – View full trial description and contact details. See also: http://www.register4.org.au/public/our-research/current-projects-seeking-volunteers/74-w-h-a-m.

  • BRCA-D (Recruiting)

    Updated: January 18th, 2016

    This study will determine the effects of Denosumab on normal breast tissue in women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, as well as in women without BRCA mutations but who are at high risk of developing breast cancer based on family history.

    You may be eligible to join this study if you are a pre-menopausal woman aged between 18 years to 50 years and have documented BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation considering prophylactic mastectomy, OR willing to undergo two breast biopsies on separate occasions. You may also be eligible if you are not known to carry a BRCA mutation, but meet certain criteria that would deem you to be at high risk of developing breast cancer due to your family history.

    View trial description and contact details.

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